How can the reader interpret the theme of a story

how can the reader interpret the theme of a story

4 Ways to Analyze Theme

Nov 16, EXPLANATION: Theme is the central topic of a story or writing. Simply said, it is the message that the author or writer wants to convey Theme can be of two types - one is where the readers interpret the theme or subject of the writing, second is where the writer or the text suggests a theme. Both can be same if interpreted in a proper manner. Find an answer to your question How can the reader best interpret the theme of a story? angel angel 09/25/ English Middle School +5 pts. Answered How can the reader best interpret the theme of a story? See answer DianaDottie DianaDottie Answer: By focusing on details from the story that suggest a universal truth. emigu39 emigu

The novel presents the inability to read as a form of dependence. These choices her decision to work for the SS, her false confession to being the leader of the prison guards prove disastrous and life-altering. By contrast, Hanna seems unable to fully understand why she is on trial in the first place and how she comes across to the jury.

Reflecting on the impact of her illiteracy at her trial, Michael notes that the enormous amount of energy Hanna must have spent on hiding her illiteracy could have been applied to learning how to read. Rather than address the problem, Hanna chooses, for most of her life, to hide it, leading her to work for the SS, where she seems unaware of the untold harm she is inflicting on others.

The readers within the novel represent three major groups of people involved in the Holocaust: the victims, the perpetrators, and the next generation. Michael, a member of the generation that followed the Holocaust, reads aloud to Hanna as part of their ritual of reading, showering, and sex. The victims of the Holocaust, the concentration camp prisoners, read to Hanna in secret before she sent them off to Auschwitz.

It is only by learning how to read that Hanna is finally able to understand her role as a perpetrator of the Holocaust and the impact her actions have had on her victims. I asked her about her life, and it was as if she rummaged around in a dusty chest to get me the answers. She had grown up in a German community in Rumania, then come to Berlin at the age of sixteen, taken a job at the Siemens factory, and ended up in the army at twenty-one. She was thirty-six. She told me all this as if it were not her life but somebody else's, someone she didn't know well and who wasn't important to her.

Things I wanted to know more about had vanished completely from her mind, and she didn't understand why I was interested in what had happened to her parents, whether she had had brothers and sisters, how she had lived in Berlin and what she'd done in the army.

I mean She did not know what she should or could have done differently, and therefore wanted to hear from the judge, who seemed to know everything, what he would have done. During the trial the manuscript was available, but to those directly involved.

I had to read the book in English, an unfamiliar and laborious exercise at the time. And as always, the alien language, unmastered and struggled over, created a what is a sonic blast concatenation of what is a hurricane and how is it created and immediacy.

I worked through the book with particular thoroughness and yet did not make it my own. It remained as alien as the language itself. Years later I reread it and discovered that it is the book that creates distance. It does not invite one to identify with it and makes no one sympathetic, neither the mother nor the daughter, nor those who shared their fate in various camps and finally in Auschwitz and the satellite camp near Cracow.

It exudes the very numbness I have tried to describe before. But even in her numbness the daughter did not lose the ability to observe and analyze. I was oddly moved by the discrepancy between what must have been Hanna's actual concerns when she left my hometown and what I had imagined and how to put the fire back in your relationship at the how to grit a road. I had been sure that I had driven her away because I had betrayed and denied her, when in fact she had simply been running away from being found out by the streetcar company.

However, the fact that I had not driven her away did not change the fact that I had betrayed her. So I was still guilty. And if I was not guilty because one cannot be guilty of betraying a criminal, then I was guilty of having loved a criminal. I don't know if Hanna knew how she looked, or maybe she wanted to look like that.

She was wearing a black suit and a white blouse, and the cut of the suit and the tie that went with the blouse made her look as if she were in uniform. I have never seen the uniform of the women who worked for the SS. But I believed, and the spectators all believed, that what to mix with cognac hennessy us we were seeing that uniform, and the woman who had worked for the SS in it, and all the crimes Hanna was accused of doing.

I don't know what I would have done if a professor of legal history had not offered me a research job. Gertrud said it was an evasion, an escape from the challenges and responsibilities of life, and she was right. I escaped and was relieved that I could do so. Now escape involves not just running away, but arriving somewhere. Doing history means building bridges between the past and the present, observing both banks of the river, taking an active part on both sides.

One of my areas of research was law in the Third Reich, and here it is particularly obvious how the past and present come together in a single reality. Here, escape is not a preoccupation with the past, but a determined focus on the present and the future that is blind to the legacy of the past which brands us and with which we must live.

I also read books I already knew and loved. For a long time I didn't dare to read poetry, but eventually I really enjoyed it, and I learned many of the poems I read by heart. I can still say them today. Taken together, the titles in the notebook testify to a great and fundamental confidence in bourgeois culture. I do not ever remember asking myself whether I should go beyond Kafka, Frisch, Johnson, Bachmann, and Lenz, and read experimental literature, literature in which I did not recognize the story or like any of the characters.

To me it was obvious that experimental literature was experimenting with the reader, and Hanna didn't need that and neither did I. I read the note and was filled with joy and jubilation. I knew about the helplessness in everyday activities, finding one's way or finding an address or choosing a meal in a restaurant, about how illiterates anxiously stick to prescribed patterns and familiar routines, about how much energy it takes to conceal one's inability to read and write, energy lost to actual living.

Illiteracy is dependence. By finding the courage to learn to read and write, Hanna had advanced from dependence to independence, a step towards liberation. But why should I have given her a place in my life? I reacted indignantly against my own bad conscience at the thought that I had reduced her to a niche.

I mean, didn't you ever think about them when we were together, when I was reading to you? And you know, when no one understands you, then no one can call you to account. Not even the court could call me to account. But the dead can. They understand. They don't even have to have been there, but if they were, they understand even better. The Reader. Plot Summary. LitCharts Teacher Editions.

Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. Detailed explanations, analysis, and how to treat porous hair info for every important quote on LitCharts. The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play. Sign Up. Already have an account? Sign in. From the creators of SparkNotes, something better. Sign In Sign Up. Literature Poetry Lit Terms Shakescleare.

Download this LitChart! Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Reader can help. Themes All Themes. Symbols All Symbols. Theme Wheel. Everything you need for every book you read. The way the content is organized and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive.

Themes and Colors. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Readerwhich you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Related Themes from Other Texts. Compare and contrast themes from other texts to this theme.

Find Related Themes. How often theme appears:. Part 1, Chapter 1. Part 1, Chapter 2. Part 1, Chapter 3. Part 1, How to reinstall microsoft word starter 2010 4. Part 1, Chapter 5. Part 1, Chapter 6. Part 1, Chapter 7. Part 1, Chapter 8. Part 1, Chapter 9. Part 1, Chapter Part 2, Chapter 1.

Part 2, Chapter 2. Part 2, Chapter 3.

The Reader

Dec 31, How can the theme of a story best be interpreted by the reader? A. The reader can rewrite the story using a different point of view. B. The reader can imagine what happens next to the characters. C. The reader can find a universal truth from the details in the story. D. The reader can provide a summary of the events discussed in the story. Furthermore, certain themes can be understood by people regardless of age, gender, geography, or culture. This commonality makes them universal. Universal themes developed in a story, poem, or play ultimately expand the readers knowledge of being human by the expression of experiences through different perspectives. In writing an essay that analyzes how elements of fiction convey theme in a short story, use at least these essential elements of fiction: setting, characters, plot (including conflict and resolution), theme and personal appeal.

The primary concern of the novel is guilt about the Holocaust. Examining the role of guilt in post-war Germany, The Reader presents guilt as a pervasive and inevitable force. An important motif running throughout the story is the question of who must be held responsible for atrocities committed during the Holocaust. Michael and his generation lay blame on not only the Nazi perpetrators but also the bystanders the previous generation who looked the other. As the novel moves forward, we learn that part of this distance is caused by the secrets they keep from those around them.

When Michael tries to keep his relationship with Hanna a secret, he becomes increasingly distant from his friends and family. For example, after returning home from sleeping with Hanna for the first time and lying about where. The novel, which is deeply concerned with guilt, explores the tension that collective guilt creates between parents and children. The novel presents the inability to read as a form of dependence. These choices her. A recurring motif in the novel is the idea that images function as memory.

As a law student, Michael and his classmates use the. The Reader. Plot Summary. LitCharts Teacher Editions. Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts.

The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play. Sign Up. Already have an account? Sign in. From the creators of SparkNotes, something better.

Sign In Sign Up. Literature Poetry Lit Terms Shakescleare. Download this LitChart! Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Reader can help. Themes All Themes. Symbols All Symbols. Theme Wheel. Everything you need for every book you read.

The way the content is organized and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive. Themes and Colors. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Reader , which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Guilt, Responsibility, and the Holocaust. Michael and his generation lay blame on not only the Nazi perpetrators but also the bystanders the previous generation who looked the other read analysis of Guilt, Responsibility, and the Holocaust.

Secrets, Indifference, and Emotional Distance. For example, after returning home from sleeping with Hanna for the first time and lying about where read analysis of Secrets, Indifference, and Emotional Distance. Generational and Parent-Child Conflict. Reading and Illiteracy. These choices her read analysis of Reading and Illiteracy. The Image as Memory and the Gaze.

As a law student, Michael and his classmates use the read analysis of The Image as Memory and the Gaze. Cite This Page. Home About Story Contact Help. Previous Part 3, Chapter The Reader Themes.

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