What does the health check symbol mean

what does the health check symbol mean

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MEDICAL ABBREVIATION AND COMMON SYMBOLS A assessment A 1% atropine 1% aa of each AA Aplastic anemia A/A alveolar-arterial oxygen content gradient ck check, creatine kinase cl chloride, clearance, contact lens CLL chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Serpents. Within ancient Egyptian culture, serpents often served as symbols of health, healing, and protection. For example, the mythological goddess Wadjet, depicted at different times as a cobra or as a woman with a cobra head, was the protector of Lower Egypt and all pharaohs, and often symbolized general protection and healing.

The image of serpents wrapped around a staff is a familiar one in the medical field, decorating pharmaceutical packaging and hospitals alike. Snakes bites are generally bad news, and so the animal might seem ill-fitting as the symbol of the medical profession, but the ancient emblem actually has a quite a story behind it. There are actually two versions of the symbol. The winged version is known as a caduceus, how to conceal really bad dark circles stick is actually a staff that was carried by the Olympian god Hermes.

In Greek mythology, Hermes was a messenger between the gods and humans which explains the wings and a guide to the underworld which explains the staff. Hermes was also the patron of travelers, which makes his connection to medicine appropriate because, in the olden days, doctors had to travel great distances by foot in order to visit their patients.

In one version of Hermes' myth, he is given the staff by Apollo, the god of healing. In another version, he receives the staff from Zeus, the king of the gods, and it is entwined with two white ribbons. The ribbons were later replaced by serpents, as one what is dab radio coverage tells that Hermes used the stick to separate two fighting snakeswho then coiled around his staff and remained there in balanced harmony.

Another, earlier depiction of the medical symbol is the staff of Asclepius, thought it has no wings and only one snake. The son of Apollo and the human princess Coronis, Asclepius is the Greek demigod of medicine.

According to mythology, he was able to restore the health of the sick and bring the dead back to life. In one telling, Zeus killed Asclepius with a thunderbolt for disrupting the natural order of the world by reviving the dead, while another version states that Zeus killed him as punishment for accepting money in exchange for conducting a resurrection.

After he died, Zeus placed Asclepius among the stars as the constellation Ophiuchus, or "the serpent bearer. The Greeks regarded snakes as sacred and used them in healing rituals to honor Asclepius, as snake venom was thought to be remedial and their skin-shedding was viewed as a symbol of rebirth and renewal.

Which is a good thing to keep in mind the next time you spot a medical alert bracelet featuring the seemingly sinister serpents. Got a question? Send us an email and we'll crack it. Live Science. Please deactivate your ad blocker in order to see our subscription offer.

Definition of Doctors’ symbol

x dash above any symbol indicates a mean value † x ? dot above any symbol indicates a timed event a before abd abdomen ABG arterial blood gas ac before meals ad lib as needed AFB acid-fast bacillus AM aerosol mask amt amount anat anatomical ant anterior approx approximately AV atrioventricular bid twice daily BP blood pressure B/S breath. Symbol for "temperature limitation." The upper and lower temperature limits will be indicated on either side of the symbol. This symbol is a mandatory marking for devices entering the European market to indicate conformity with the essential health and safety requirements set out in European Directives. The symbol . Mar 10,  · The image of serpents wrapped around a staff is a familiar one in the medical field, decorating pharmaceutical packaging and hospitals alike. .

Many societies throughout history have designated certain images as medical symbols, often used in medicinal rituals or to invoke feelings of protection and care. Practitioners of ancient Egyptian medicine would often use snakes as a symbol of protection in their magical healthcare rituals.

In modern times, internationally recognized symbols such as the red cross are used to identify medical services for example, red cross first aid kits. These icons, in a wide variety of forms and origins, have aided the healthcare of humankind throughout its history. Within ancient Egyptian culture, serpents often served as symbols of health, healing, and protection. For example, the mythological goddess Wadjet, depicted at different times as a cobra or as a woman with a cobra head, was the protector of Lower Egypt and all pharaohs, and often symbolized general protection and healing.

Though these serpentine symbols in ancient Egyptian culture do not seem to be restricted to representations of health and protection, they are often associated. A connection here can be seen in Hebrew culture within the Biblical book of Numbers, where Moses, while leading the Israelites from Egyptian captivity, crafts a snake made of bronze and sits it atop a pole.

God tells him in the text that whenever anyone was bitten by a snake, they could look at the pole to be healed. Egyptian cultural influence likely played a key factor here, as the serpent used as a symbol of healing is not a repeated theme seen in Hebrew culture.

Within American culture, the Caduceus — the winged staff with two twisting snakes — is one of the most commonly used medical symbols. For example, Caduceus emblem pins are often used at medical school graduation ceremonies. Its widespread presence in the West can be traced back to a misuse of the icon by the US Army beginning in the 19th century.

In ancient mythology, the Caduceus was wielded by several analogous deities within their respective cultures; Hermes in Greek mythology, Hermes Trismegistus in Greco-Egyptian mythology, and Mercury in Roman mythology. In every case, this serpentine staff represented negotiation and commerce; the two snakes symbolizing a balance in transactions. Within Egyptian and Greco-Roman culture, the Caduceus itself was not in any way considered a symbol of health or protection.

In the mid 19th century, the US Army began to use the image of the Caduceus on signage and uniforms of medical personnel. This was presumably due to a confusion between the Caduceus and the Rod of Asclepius, discussed below, the latter of which actually did serve as a health and medical symbol in Greco-Roman culture. For further reading, refer to The golden wand of medicine: A history of the caduceus symbol in medicine by Walter J.

The Rod of Asclepius — the plain staff with one snake entwined — is the true Greco-Roman medical symbol. Within Greek mythology, the staff was wielded by Asclepius, the god of healing and medicine. Whether the deity lent this symbolism to the staff or vice versa is uncertain.

The snake itself as a symbol of health and medicine likely has ties to Egyptian culture, as discussed above. Due to this symbolism, physicians in ancient Greece would use nonvenomous Aesculapian snakes named after this mythological god in healthcare rituals, often leaving them to slither the floors near sick patients.

The International Committee of the Red Cross has provided immeasurable humanitarian services since its establishment in the late 19th century. The red cross is one of the most internationally recognized medical symbols, used to identify nonpartisan medical services for victims of conflict regardless of race or military alignment.

Medical services are often identified with a red cross flag. The origins of this symbol and the service it signifies lie with Swiss entrepreneur Jean Henri Dunant — In , Dunant witnessed the gory aftermath of the Battle of Solferino, fought between France and Sardinia, in which 40, were killed or injured.

Seeing the masses of unattended wounded, he began work on an idea to solve this issue. The following year, the Geneva Society for Public Welfare was founded to discuss such an idea though the name was soon changed to International Committee for Relief to the Wounded. In , the first Geneva Convention, detailing the requirements for such relief organizations, was adopted by the US, Brazil, Mexico, and all of Europe.

These organizations and their personnel needed to be easily identifiable, so a red cross on a white background was designated as the medical symbol to be used.

As the symbol became increasingly recognizable internationally, the committee changed its name to the International Committee of the Red Cross in During the Serbian—Ottoman and Russo-Turkish Wars from to , the Ottoman Empire declared it would use a red crescent as its medical symbol in place of the red cross, as it claimed the cross was offensive to its Muslim soldiers.

For this conflict, the crescent was temporarily, unofficially recognized. In , at the Diplomatic Conference to revise the Geneva Conventions, the red crescent was officially recognized — along with the red lion and sun, which had been used by Iran though has been replaced by the red crescent since However, despite being a legally recognized health symbol internationally, it is not a widely recognizable symbol of such internationally, as use of the red cross far exceeds that of the red crescent.

To solve the issue of the religious disparities of the red cross and red crescent medical symbols, at the Diplomatic Conference in Geneva, the US proposed the red crystal as a third alternative health symbol.

Not only was it designed to be devoid of any religious connotations, but it also allowed for organizations to place any other of the three medical symbols such as the cross, crescent, or lion and sun inside it. Over the following two years, this symbol was accepted and legally codified as part of the International Red Cross Red Crescent Movement. Walton, A. The cult of Asklepios. Ulan Press. Wilkinson, T. Early dynastic Egypt Revised Edition. London: Routledge.

Corn, G. Friedlander, W. The golden wand of medicine: A history of the caduceus symbol in medicine. The history of the emblems. Health Ahoy may earn commissions on purchases from this page. Health Ahoy may earn commissions on purchases. Serpents Within ancient Egyptian culture, serpents often served as symbols of health, healing, and protection.

The Caduceus — Winged Rod With Twisting Serpents the Caduceus Within American culture, the Caduceus — the winged staff with two twisting snakes — is one of the most commonly used medical symbols.

The Red Cross, Crescent, and Crystal The International Committee of the Red Cross has provided immeasurable humanitarian services since its establishment in the late 19th century. Red Cross the red cross The red cross is one of the most internationally recognized medical symbols, used to identify nonpartisan medical services for victims of conflict regardless of race or military alignment. Red Crescent the red crescent During the Serbian—Ottoman and Russo-Turkish Wars from to , the Ottoman Empire declared it would use a red crescent as its medical symbol in place of the red cross, as it claimed the cross was offensive to its Muslim soldiers.

Red Crystal the red crystal To solve the issue of the religious disparities of the red cross and red crescent medical symbols, at the Diplomatic Conference in Geneva, the US proposed the red crystal as a third alternative health symbol. Bibliography Walton, A.

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