What is harlem renaissance literature

what is harlem renaissance literature

Black heritage and American culture

Jul 20,  · The Harlem Renaissance was a period in American history from the s and s. During this time, many African-Americans migrated from the South to Northern cities, seeking economic and creative opportunities. Within their communities creative expression became an outlet for writers, musicians, artists, and photographers, with a particular. Jan 21,  · The Harlem Renaissance was the development of the Harlem neighborhood in NYC as a black cultural mecca in the early 20th century and the subsequent social .

Have a question? Need assistance? Use our online form to what date is the full moon in october a librarian for help. The Harlem Renaissance was a period in American history from the s and s.

During this time, many African-Americans migrated from the South to Northern cities, seeking economic and creative opportunities. Within their communities creative expression became an outlet for writers, musicians, artists, and photographers, with a particular concentration in Harlem, New York.

This guide provides access to selected Library of Congress digital and print resources as well as links to external websites on the Harlem Renaissance:.

Search this Guide Search. Harlem Renaissance African-American expressions of writing, music, and art during the s and s are well represented in the vast collections of the Library of Congress.

Introduction The Harlem Renaissance was a period in American history from the s and s. Digital Collections. Related Resources. Today in History. External Websites. Selected Bibliography. William Gottlieb. Portrait of Louis Armstrong. William P. Gottlieb Collection. Library of Congress Music Division. Carl Van Vechten. Portrait of Josephine Baker, Paris. Van Vechten Collection. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Back to top. Hosted by Springshare.

Great Migration

Harlem Renaissance - Harlem Renaissance - Black heritage and American culture: This interest in Black heritage coincided with efforts to define an American culture distinct from that of Europe, one that would be characterized by ethnic pluralism as well as a democratic ethos. The concept of cultural pluralism (a term coined by the philosopher Horace Kallen in ) inspired notions of the. In the early 20th century, New York City's Harlem neighborhood underwent a historic transformation. During what is now described as the Harlem Renaissance, the area thrived as a cultural hub for African Americans, culminating in unprecedented advancements in art, literature, and music. Nevertheless, by at least one measure, its success was clear: the Harlem Renaissance was the first time that a considerable number of mainstream publishers and critics took African American literature seriously, and it was the first time that African American literature and the arts attracted significant attention from the nation at large.

Aaron Douglas was one of the pioneers of the development of African American art. He was a significant member of the Harlem Renaissance movement of the s and s. Later in his life, he promoted the development of arts education in African American communities from his position as the first head of the art department at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee.

His father was a baker and highly valued education despite his low income. Douglas' mother was an amateur artist, and her interest in drawing inspired her son, Aaron. Following high school graduation, Aaron Douglas wanted to attend college, but he couldn't afford the tuition.

He traveled to Detroit, Michigan, with a friend and worked in a Cadillac plant while attending art classes in the evening at the Detroit Museum of Art. Douglas later reported being a victim of racial discrimination at the Cadillac plant. In , Douglas was finally able to enroll at the University of Nebraska. Historians speculate it was due to racial segregation in the military.

He transferred to the University of Minnesota where he rose to the rank of corporal in the SATC before the end of the war in Aaron Douglas fulfilled a dream of moving to New York City in There he studied with artist Winold Reiss, who encouraged him to use his African heritage for artistic inspiration. Reiss drew on the legacy of German folk paper-cuts for his work, and that influence is seen in Douglas' illustration work. Soon, Aaron Douglas found his reputation as an illustrator rising quickly.

That work also led to work for nationally popular magazines Harpers and Vanity Fair. Early in the following decade, Douglas began painting mural commissions that brought him national fame. For subject matter, Douglas drew on the history of the African American experience from enslavement through the Reconstruction to twentieth-century lynching and segregation. It depicts life in Africa before enslavement as joyous, proud, and firmly rooted in the community.

Aaron Douglas became the first president of the Harlem Artists Guild in The organization promoted young African American artists and lobbied the Works Progress Administration to provide more opportunities for them. In , Aaron Douglas earned a fellowship from the Rosenwald Foundation, a generous provider of stipends to hundreds of African American artists and writers.

The funds allowed him to travel to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and the Virgin Islands and create watercolor paintings of life there. Upon returning to the U. Johnson, the first African American president of Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, invited Douglas to create the university's new art department.

Aaron Douglas served as head of the art department until his retirement in President John F. Kennedy invited Aaron Douglas to the White House to participate in ceremonies honoring the th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation in Douglas continued to appear as a guest lecturer after retirement until his death in Some consider Aaron Douglas to be "the father of Black American art.

The bold, graphical style of his work is echoed in the work of many artists. Contemporary artist Kara Walker exhibits the influence of Douglas's use of silhouettes and paper cut-outs. Share Flipboard Email. Bill Lamb. Music Expert. Bill Lamb is a music and arts writer with two decades of experience covering the world of entertainment and culture.

Cite this Article Format. Lamb, Bill. Aaron Douglas, Harlem Renaissance Painter. Arna Bontemps, Documenting the Harlem Renaissance. Literary Timeline of the Harlem Renaissance. Black History and Women's Timeline: Biography of W. Du Bois, Black Activist and Scholar. African Americans in the Progressive Era.

Black History and Women's Timeline: — ThoughtCo uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By using ThoughtCo, you accept our.

2 thoughts on “What is harlem renaissance literature

Add a comment

Your email will not be published.. Required fields are marked *